[Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality] E–pub Á Richard Kluger

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  • Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality
  • Richard Kluger
  • English
  • 25 October 2020
  • 9781400030613

Richard Kluger Í 5 Free read

Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality Read & Download ↠ 105 Uggle for human dignity in process since the birth of the nationHere is the human drama told in all its dimensions of the many plaintiffs men women and children variously scared or defiant but always determined who made the hard decision to proceed – bucking the white power structure in Topeka Kansas; braving night riders in rural South Carolina; rallying fellow high school students in strictly segregated Prince Edward County Virginia – and at a dozen other times and places showing their refusal to accept defeatHere too is the extraordinary tale told for the first time of the black legal establishment forced literally to invent itself before it could join the fight then patiently assembling in courtroom after courtroom a body of law that would serve to free its people from thralldom to unjust laws Heroes abound some obscure like Charles Houston who built Howard Law School into a rigorous academy for black lawyers and the Reverend JA DeLaine the minister teacher who despite bitter opposition organized and led the first crucial fight for educational euality in the Jim Crow South others like Thurgood Marshall justly famous. It was a long one but I m glad I got through this important book that documented the history and legacy of Brown v Board of EducationSome exceptional uotesIn their zeal to slash handouts to those struggling with poverty the new conservative policymakers who would run the federal government for the next dozen years never bothered to analyze the potential cost benefits of sustained rehabilitation programs for the nation s needy ie whether a well directed helping hand in the form of preschool learning assistance job training drug rehabilitation low cost business loans and maximum school desegregation might not dramatically reduce US taxpayers bills for jobless benefits aid to dependent children drug abuse crime control and medical treatment for the poorAmericans simply seem dedicated to exploring outer space than to saving their inner cities we lavish our wealth on outsized vehicles and state of the art weaponry rather than on improving young minds or caring for the public health The result has been an extreme maldistribution of the nation s wealth that outrages remarkably few Americans Only an unpredictable wind shift toward altruism seems likely to power a new national consensus that identifies government as neither enemy nor savior but as a useful tool when put prudently to the task As long as those put in charge of it profess to hate it government cannot be the prime mover in the pursuit of justice Glory Goals and Greed years never bothered to analyze the potential cost benefits of sustained rehabilitation programs for the nation s needy ie whether a well directed helping hand in the form of preschool learning assistance job training drug rehabilitation low cost business loans and maximum school desegregation might not dramatically reduce US taxpayers bills for jobless benefits aid to dependent children drug abuse crime control and medical treatment for the poorAmericans simply seem dedicated to exploring outer space than to saving their inner cities we lavish our wealth on outsized vehicles and state of the art weaponry rather than on improving Spoken From the Front 2 young minds or caring for the public health The result has been an extreme maldistribution of the nation s wealth that outrages remarkably few Americans Only an unpredictable wind shift toward altruism seems likely to power a new national consensus that identifies government as neither enemy nor savior but as a useful tool when put prudently to the task As long as those put in charge of it profess to hate it government cannot be the prime mover in the pursuit of justice

Read & Download Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for EualitySimple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality

Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality Read & Download ↠ 105 Simple Justice is generally regarded as the classic account of the US Supreme Court’s epochal decision outlawing racial segregation and the centerpiece of African Americans’ ongoing crusade for eual justice under lawThe 1954 Supreme Court ruling in the case of Brown v Board of Education brought centuries of legal segregation in this country to an end It was and remains beyond uestion one of the truly significant events in American history “probably the most important American government act of any kind since the Emancipation Proclamation” in the view of constitutional scholar Louis H Pollak The Brown decision climaxed a long torturous battle for black euality in education making hard law out of vague principles and opening the way for the broad civil rights upheavals of the 1960s and beyondSimple Justice is the story of that battle Richard Kluger traces the background of the epochal decision from its remote legal and cultural roots to the complex personalities of those who brought about its realization The result is a landmark work of popular history graceful and fascinatingly detailed the panoramic account of a str. My ancestry is entirely Southern on both my father s and my mother s side Several relatives fought for the Confederacy and a great grandfather raised cotton and was a cotton broker in Memphis Tennessee after the end of the Civil War When it came to pushing forward the American ideal of liberty and justice for all I m sorry to say my family was nowhere to be foundI recently visited Memphis where the National Civil Rights Museum is built into the Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King Jr was killed fifty years ago I also visited a private museum called Slave Haven in the home of an unusual white man who helped slaves to escape on the underground railroad In the news recently was the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice that features a powerful exhibit on the lynching of black men in AmericaI hope everyone can visit these places Nobody should leave them with a sense of complacency Slavery is gone That ended The American Horror Story part 1 but it was succeeded by part 2 which could be said to have ended with the Supreme Court decision around which this book is built Brown vs Board of Education of Topeka Kansas Could we say there is a part 3 still going on today what with police executions of blacks chronicled with videos for all to see and a hugely disproportionate number of blacks in prison Too many schools remain segregated simply by the fact that whites have either rushed to leave the cities have enrolled their kids in private schools or home school their kids That this segregation exists is no fault of the effort at school desegregation that Simple Justice is about but for every legal success there is a way to get around itRichard Kluger has written a document Contained within the 800 pages is a thorough look at the plight of the Negro the primary term used for black Americans throughout the book written in 1975 from the start of an unwilling arrival before American independence The account is often shocking freuently revealing always educational It takes a good third of the text to provide the truly awful background information necessary as a foundation for understanding all the work that needed to be done to begin to remedy what was so acceptable to white AmericaThe reader will find out about Radical Reconstruction immediately after the Civil War when the southern states did all they could to keep blacks in a state of slavery even if officially it was outlawed An irate Congress clamped down on blatant Southern moves to keep the boot of the white man on the black man s neck passing the 13th 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution but as could be expected interest in doing the right thing flagged rapidly as Northern financial interests saw the benefits of allowing Southern racism free rein in exchange for the opening up of a new territory from which to profitA Supreme Court ruling in 1896 Plessy vs Ferguson made separate but eual facilities for blacks on railroads legal and a new frontier of segregation advanced shunning blacks from all manner of services such as restaurants hotels movie theatersand schools Separation was the operative word with euality being ignored The first decades of the 20th century saw the lives of blacks made miserable as white Southerners dreamed up ingenious ways of denying blacks the vote or any kind of decent work and engaged in lynchings with enthusiasmThe author follows the use of black troops in France in WW1 where they realized that there could be euality between the races He tells of Booker T Washington s philosophy of the black man working his way up on his own to take his place with whites something whites accepted with glee as it put no responsibility on the whites for what they had done to erect every hurdle they could think of to keep the Negro downThe start by whites of all black Howard University the creation mostly by whites of the NAACP National Association for the Advancement of Colored People the defiant writing of WEB DuBois the position of US presidents on racial issuesit s all here No significant personalities in the struggle over justice black or white are neglected and each gets a generous introduction The reader is never wondering why things happen as they do because of the rich background Richard Lugar provides making sense of every development along the wayReacting to the long history of injustice typified by schools that were segregated a handful of black intellectuals all connected to Howard University several being attorneys with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund headed by Thurgood Marshall go out to build the case that segregation between groups is inherently uneual From this point the author moves into yet another subject the workings of the American justice system and the Supreme Court This book is thick for a reason Simple Justice made me appreciate how shallow and essentially worthless are standard history texts texts that offer what are little than headlines that could hardly do than leave the student of history at a loss for the meaning of what happened in the past and how it connects to the present The guiding principle is to let no school board be offendedIt s unfortunate that the people who most need to know what is in this book are very unlikely to read it and no reading can be effective if there is no motivation to learn what the text has to say In my dream world every police officer would know the story that Richard Lugar tells so well in Simple Justice I doubt anyone would not be moved by this book though one might be depressed that 43 years have passed since it was published and 64 years have passed since the Brown decision was made by the Supreme CourtI was disappointed when I visited the National Civil Rights Museum that this book was not for sale in the book store there Though it deals with the time before Martin Luther King Jr rose to acclaim it presents the earlier years of the outright denial of civil rights in a way that deserves wide readership Secret Diary of a Grumpy Old Woman years ago I also visited a private museum called Slave Haven in the home of an unusual white man who helped slaves to escape on the underground railroad In the news recently was the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice that features a powerful exhibit on the lynching of black men in AmericaI hope everyone can visit these places Nobody should leave them with a sense of complacency Slavery is gone That ended The American Horror Story part 1 but it was succeeded by part 2 which could be said to have ended with the Supreme Court decision around which this book is built Brown vs Board of Education of Topeka Kansas Could we say there is a part 3 still going on today what with police executions of blacks chronicled with videos for all to see and a hugely disproportionate number of blacks in prison Too many schools remain segregated simply by the fact that whites have either rushed to leave the cities have enrolled their kids in private schools or home school their kids That this segregation exists is no fault of the effort at school desegregation that Simple Justice is about but for every legal success there is a way to get around itRichard Kluger has written a document Contained within the 800 pages is a thorough look at the plight of the Negro the primary term used for black Americans throughout the book written in 1975 from the start of an unwilling arrival before American independence The account is often shocking freuently revealing always educational It takes a good third of the text to provide the truly awful background information necessary as a foundation for understanding all the work that needed to be done to begin to remedy what was so acceptable to white AmericaThe reader will find out about Radical Reconstruction immediately after the Civil War when the southern states did all they could to keep blacks in a state of slavery even if officially it was outlawed An irate Congress clamped down on blatant Southern moves to keep the boot of the white man on the black man s neck passing the 13th 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution but as could be expected interest in doing the right thing flagged rapidly as Northern financial interests saw the benefits of allowing Southern racism free rein in exchange for the opening up of a new territory from which to profitA Supreme Court ruling in 1896 Plessy vs Ferguson made separate but eual facilities for blacks on railroads legal and a new frontier of segregation advanced shunning blacks from all manner of services such as restaurants hotels movie theatersand schools Separation was the operative word with euality being ignored The first decades of the 20th century saw the lives of blacks made miserable as white Southerners dreamed up ingenious ways of denying blacks the vote or any kind of decent work and engaged in lynchings with enthusiasmThe author follows the use of black troops in France in WW1 where they realized that there could be euality between the races He tells of Booker T Washington s philosophy of the black man working his way up on his own to take his place with whites something whites accepted with glee as it put no responsibility on the whites for what they had done to erect every hurdle they could think of to keep the Negro downThe start by whites of all black Howard University the creation mostly by whites of the NAACP National Association for the Advancement of Colored People the defiant writing of WEB DuBois the position of US presidents on racial issuesit s all here No significant personalities in the struggle over justice black or white are neglected and each gets a generous introduction The reader is never wondering why things happen as they do because of the rich background Richard Lugar provides making sense of every development along the wayReacting to the long history of injustice typified by schools that were segregated a handful of black intellectuals all connected to Howard University several being attorneys with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund headed by Thurgood Marshall go out to build the case that segregation between groups is inherently uneual From this point the author moves into Grumpy Old Women yet another subject the workings of the American justice system and the Supreme Court This book is thick for a reason Simple Justice made me appreciate how shallow and essentially worthless are standard history texts texts that offer what are little than headlines that could hardly do than leave the student of history at a loss for the meaning of what happened in the past and how it connects to the present The guiding principle is to let no school board be offendedIt s unfortunate that the people who most need to know what is in this book are very unlikely to read it and no reading can be effective if there is no motivation to learn what the text has to say In my dream world every police officer would know the story that Richard Lugar tells so well in Simple Justice I doubt anyone would not be moved by this book though one might be depressed that 43 Trap Origin #5 years have passed since it was published and 64 The Angel and the Prince years of the outright denial of civil rights in a way that deserves wide readership

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Simple Justice The History of Brown v Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Euality Read & Download ↠ 105 – but all of whose passionate devotion proved intense enough to match their missionReading Simple Justice we see how black Americans’ groundswell urge for fair treatment collides with the intransigence of white supremacists in a grinding legal campaign that inevitably found its way to the halls and chambers of the Supreme Court for a final showdown Kluger searches out and analyzes what went on there during the months of hearings and deliberations often behind closed doors laying bare the doubts disagreements and often deeply held convictions of the nine Justices He shows above all how Chief Justice Earl Warren new to the Court but old in the ways of politics achieved the impossible – a unanimous decision to reverse the 58 year old false doctrine of “separate but eual” education for blacks Impeccably researched and elegantly written this may be the most revealing report ever published of America’s highest court at workBased on extensive interviews and both published and unpublished documentary sources Simple Justice has the lineaments of an epic It will stand as the classic study of a turning point in our histor. ExuisiteThis is unuestionably one of the best books I ve ever read and I really cannot imagine how it could be outdone To summarize the book would be unfathomable A description of its scope would inevitably fall short The writing and voice is so clear yet the depth of the material is so great As the subtitle notes Simple Justice is in a way a history of the Supreme Court s decision in Brown v Board of Education But to say it is a history of the case alone risks suggesting that the book covers the legal battle alone Nothing could be further from the truth Or perhaps that s exactly on pointIt seems far from the truth because Kluger dives so deep into the lives of the litigants the arbiters the plaintiffs the defendants the actors of every scene and every story Historically the book beings long before any anti discrimination case is ever filed In face much of the first third of the book dissects and lays bare a history of racial injustice that is so key to understanding our present faults yet is so actively and intentionally buried in textbooks school lessons and the collective narrative Yet at the same time the stories of these individuals from the most famous to the most homely are the story of the case The history of racial injustice is the story of the case The history of the court is the story of the case And the lives loves and laughs of every single person who has lived in this country is the story of this seminal case Kluger presents it all He dives so deep down rabbit holes that you forget whether your reading about Brown or about the local history of some small South Carolina town Is it an expose on the inner workings of the Supreme Court or a political biography of famous historical actors It is all of that and The writing is truly elegant Accessible fascinating compelling and incredibly well documented One does not feel as though they are being dragged through a timeline nor subjected to one wild individual s view of the world This is the story that is not told or at least is not yelled Here Kluger shouts it out with all his mightAn absolutely necessary book at least because it is incredible at most because it offers a history that so freuently is so poorly presented Brilliant