(PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman


  • Hardcover
  • 327
  • A New World of Labor
  • Simon P. Newman
  • en
  • 27 October 2019
  • 9780812245196

Simon P. Newman í 9 review

characters A New World of Labor characters ¼ A New World of Labor 109 Ues that this exchange stimulated an entirely new system of bound laborFree and bound labor were defined and experienced by Britons and Africans across the British Atlantic world in uite different ways Connecting social developments in seventeenth century Britain with the British experience of slavery on the West African coast Newman demonstrates that the brutal white servant regime rather than the West African institution of slavery provided the most significant foundation for the violent system of racialized black slavery that developed in Barbados Class as mu. Newman s text is about the evolution of slavery in the West it also construes how most white and black people have historically been characterized and treated in the New World I was led here by Colin Woodard s American Nations A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America which I review later a book that suggests the American system of macro scaled chattel slavery originated in Barbados as did ideas about how the wealthy would view control and employ poor white and black laborers in the New World Starting in the early 17th century and ending around the 1830s the slave trade on this tiny island the farthest out on the Caribbean was devoted partially and then almost exclusively to sugar during the rise of the trade that would drive the cultivation of this cash crop plantation owners would find themselves vulnerable to famine rebellion piracy and severe wind damage particularly from hurricanes Sugar nonetheless made fortunes for a number of families over these two centuries A huge contributor to famine on the island was that little besides sugar was grown and often the aggressiveness of the planters led to soil depletion and severe worker degradation By the end of the seventeenth century planters and managers had grown sugar to the exclusion of all else working malnourished bound whites and enslaved Africans to death 229 Throughout the book Newman shows us how land and worker degradation were imperatives of the business drive and the two biggest reasons the system collapsedHe also tells us Barbadian models for plantation slavery and racial division were influential in the New World that the island s customs and practices spread out and took root throughout much of British America in the early 18th century 251 The book shows how poor blacks and poor whites were treated by Barbados ruling elite and how this influence radiated outward including to the American mainland where Barbadian ideas and practices had enormous influences in the Carolinas 251 for instance He also tells us that Ideas about the nature and usage of bound labor to say nothing of a developing racial ideology that had all germinated in Barbados took root all around the Caribbean and then throughout the Deep South of mainland British America 255 As a side note in the 1670s records show the majority of white and black residents of South Carolina had come from Barbados mostly freed white laborers who found little opportunity on the island and Africans sent to work in what was then called a province s expanding plantation system Newman characterizes the Barbadian slave system as one of wealthy planters marginalizing poor whites and demonizing blacks pitting poor whites and poor blacks against each other and pitting poor whites of varying ethnicities and religious practices against themselves This encouragement of racial division was catalyzed we learn by the massive conversion of bound laborers to Africans toward the end of the 17th century The book opens in 16th and 17th century England then goes to the Gold Coast in Africa modern day Ghana at the bottom of the western portion of the continent that protrudes out into the Atlantic After this we go to Barbados where we see a rise in the island s sugar industry that parallels the rise of plantation systems throughout the Americas Gold Coast trading posts generated a significant amount of wealth and slowly transformed the region into an epicenter for enslaved African labor This was due to both the need for labor in the castles and the rise of plantation slavery abroad Western civilization was becoming industrialized organized wealthier powerful and its people were becoming used to a higher standard of living There arose needs for mass production and hence for cheap labor As Gold Coast communities grew in wealth and size Newman writes slavery became common than it had been in small and isolated coastal communities before the arrival of the Europeans 166 Europeans gave the slave trade organization and increased the demand for it To give a sense of how large the communities here were becoming Newman references a Gold Coast city called Elmina which in 1669 had 8000 residents at the time mainland British America s New Amsterdam which would later be renamed New York City had a population of 1500 Near the end of the 17th century Elmina had between 12000 and 16000 residents making it as large as or even larger than Boston New York Philadelphia or Charleston the major urban settlements of mainland British North America 45 In the same passage Newman shows how the Gold Coast was a major supplier of these human commodities and the region enjoyed the lion s share of the massively expanded eighteenth century transatlantic slave trade 45 In fact some of its posts were designed for the gold trade and proved too small for the new form of commerce over in addition to slaves and gold they became centers for the trade of salt fish and various other commodities which were often sent to the New World or Europe The British and the Dutch came to dominate these territories Portugal Sweden Norway and Germany were also active there and hence they than anyone else facilitated the massive increase in slaves sent to the New World In the seventeenth century the number was about 13 million total in the eighteenth century about 75 million 45At first Barbados was a blank slate When the first Englishmen set foot on the island in 1625 he writes it was all but completely covered by a forbiddingly dense and almost impenetrable forest 54 But it didn t take long for the planters to change that We see by 1641 the average plantation was thirty seven acres with 15 bound workers most of whom were indentured servants and a decade later the average plantation had grown to eighty three acres and depended upon the labor of six indentured servants and eleven African slaves 64 These indentured servants who were usually but not always white served between three and ten years and enjoyed virtually no rightsand they were controlled by a brutal planter class 62 At this time these white servants were seen as enslaved workers in fact they were derided by the negroes as white slaves 87 One hallmark of the Barbadian system would be giving free workers as little rights as possible Servants who survived their often lengthy terms and were subseuently freed Newman writes faced few opportunities and many legal restrictions intended to keep them subservient 63 64 Soon these restrictions available work elsewhere and Barbados reputation for violence led to a diminishing of white laborers on the island the biggest factor though was the mass importation of African slaves In the mid seventeenth century Newman says planters began shifting from white servants to black slaves as the latter became a cost effective investment 85 This as would happen in America would allow planters to expand and grow while simultaneously diminishing opportunities for free whitesNewman talks about the traumatic effects of dislocation for slaves writing in Barbados as elsewhere in the Caribbean the enslaved struggled to preserve certain elements of their heritage that continued to bring meaning and fulfillment to their lives 233 Gatherings were a place where this occurred Although for the most part recreational gatherings were outlawed especially in areas away from plantations on rest days or at nighttime often slaves congregated anyway and often with tacit permission from masters We learn weekend and holiday dances may have been tolerated by planters as a safety valve better a dance than a rebellion 234 They played music on instruments made from hollow logs pottery rocks and sticks 234 It was common for planters to ban drums and horns at these gatherings as they were considered instruments of rebellion In fact the slave code reuired planters to search slave huts for themNewman s text is invested in showing how the Barbadian system would influence Western attitudes about poor black and white people for centuries to come the poor black subhuman and unworthy of citizenship the poor white eternally marginalized and diminished by the ruling eliteOne uote I d like to end on helps get to the root of what this book is trying to tell us that when the ethic for profit rules all regardless of the destruction wrought the effects are dehumanizing and environmentally devastatingIn a section titled White Slaves Newman writes The dramatic expansion of sugar production meant that relatively little of the island s arable land was devoted to food production 93 Starvation and malnourishment were common especially in the early days in some cases slaves were found dead from eating the rancid meat of animals they d dug out of the ground This would change Over time the island s agricultural output would become diverse especially when smaller plots of land could produce cane but in this uote we see how a drive for profit at all costs results in destruction of the land and the debasing of the worker in the name of maximum value for the landowners until the system breaks

Free read ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub í Simon P. Newman

A New World of Labor

characters A New World of Labor characters ¼ A New World of Labor 109 Ch as race informed the creation of plantation slavery in Barbados and throughout British America Enslaved Africans in Barbados were deployed in radically new ways in order to cultivate process and manufacture sugar on single integrated plantations This Barbadian system informed the development of racial slavery on Jamaica and other Caribbean islands as well as in South Carolina and then the Deep South of mainland British North America Drawing on British and West African precedents and then radically reshaping them Barbados planters invented a new world of labor. Understanding Oppression African American Rights Then and NowA New World of Labor The Development of Plantation Slavery in the British Atlantic by Simon P Newman University of Glasgow Among the very best studies we now have of labor systems and of ordinary people in the British Atlantic World It focuses on workers Europeans Africans and people of mixed races who of course accounted for the majority of the inhabitants of that world slavery european africa world

characters A New World of Labor

characters A New World of Labor characters ¼ A New World of Labor 109 The small and remote island of Barbados seems an unlikely location for the epochal change in labor that overwhelmed it and much of British America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries However by 1650 it had become the greatest wealth producing area in the English speaking world the center of an exchange of people and goods between the British Isles the Gold Coast of West Africa and the New World By the early seventeenth century than half a million enslaved men women and children had been transported to the island In A New World of Labor Simon P Newman arg. Well researched wonderfully non judgemental and as objective as it can get and a very interesting take on hot plantation slavery actually developed I particularly appreciated how he contrasted the development of slavery in Africa with how it changed and developed in the Americas because I am frankly tired of certain depictions that are prominent in the media


4 thoughts on “(PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman

  1. says: (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Simon P. Newman í 9 review Free read ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub í Simon P. Newman

    (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Free read ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub í Simon P. Newman characters A New World of Labor Well researched wonderfully non judgemental and as objective as it can get and a very interesting take on hot plantation slavery actua

  2. says: characters A New World of Labor (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman

    (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Newman’s text is about the evolution of slavery in the West; it also construes how most white and black people have historically been characterized and treated in the “New World” I was led here by Colin Woodard’s American Nations A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America which I review late

  3. says: (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Simon P. Newman í 9 review Free read ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub í Simon P. Newman

    (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Understanding Oppression African American Rights Then and NowA New World of Labor The Development of Plantation Slavery in

  4. says: characters A New World of Labor (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Free read ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub í Simon P. Newman

    (PDF NEW) [A New World of Labor] ✓ Simon P. Newman Excellent book Can't wait to hopefully study with Dr Newman next year

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