PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs


  • Hardcover
  • 269
  • Atlas of a Lost World
  • Craig Childs
  • English
  • 20 July 2019
  • 9780307908650

10 thoughts on “PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

  1. says: Free download Atlas of a Lost World PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Atlas of a Lost World Travels in Ice Age America is an elegiac meditation on the possible history of humans in the Ice Age Americas I say possible because the picture drawn by Childs compiled from the research of scientists over th

  2. says: PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Interesting provocative bookA survey of what happened when where how and sometimes why Mr Childs has traveled extensively all over North America sometimes in a truck other times on foot in a kayak on all terrain vehicles Once he settles into a location a desert a forest a swamp in the southeast he gives an overview of the present day topograp

  3. says: Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download This is not a scientific text Not even close What this is is a lyrical travelogue through ice age sites in America Childs doesn't show us The Story of prehistoric man on this continent but rather A Story filled with possibilities even probabilities based on evidence of tool making camp sites kill sites and his own vivid imaginings

  4. says: Free download Atlas of a Lost World PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    Free download Atlas of a Lost World Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download I have a bit of a reader crush on Childs His blend of personal narrative and succinct vivid relatable and compe

  5. says: PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs Free download Atlas of a Lost World Most of Craig Childs’ books follow the same formula he picks a topic writes half a book about it then fills the other half with his own adventures often getting pretty personal in the process and ties his adventures back to his topic His prose is usually very polished and well written this one is no different but his books tend to be a little uneven skirting that fine line between “interesting” and “b

  6. says: Free download Atlas of a Lost World PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Craig Childs is passionate about prehistory He seems to be familiar with every archaeological dig from Canada to South America which allows him to make connections between peoples and times some of them conjectural but none entirely implausible He is skilled at being able to take one or two artifacts and build from them a seuence of ever expa

  7. says: PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Free download Atlas of a Lost World Interesting subject; crap execution The writer's style is that of wannabe novelistpoet and it hampers the uality of the work What's worse and the reason I stopped reading halfway through was the statement on page 144 that c

  8. says: Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download Any person who comes at this book as an inuisitive homo sapien looking for a book that will inform you about the nice details of the ice age will be disappointed It is of a personal diary with small tidbits about the ice age The book

  9. says: Free download Atlas of a Lost World Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download Free download Atlas of a Lost World Well written but filled with too much rumination from 21st century man

  10. says: Free download Atlas of a Lost World PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download

    PDF or EBOOK (Atlas of a Lost World) á Craig Childs Most of the book are the author's personal experiences which were of zero interest to me and I gave up on it after about 10%

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Atlas of a Lost World

characters Atlas of a Lost World ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download The land bridge was not the only way across Different people arrived from different directions and not all at the same timeThe first explorers of the New World were few their encampments fleeting The continent they reached had no people but was inhabited by megafauna mastodons giant bears mammoths saber toothed cats five hundred pound panthers enormous bison and sloths that stood one story tall The first people were hunters Paleolithic spear points are still encrusted with the proteins of their prey but they were wildly outnumbered and many wou. Craig Childs is passionate about prehistory He seems to be familiar with every archaeological dig from Canada to South America which allows him to make connections between peoples and times some of them conjectural but none entirely implausible He is skilled at being able to take one or two artifacts and build from them a seuence of ever expanding cultural connections His connect the dots style reminded me of the philosopher Rousseau if you accept premise A and premise B follows logically from it and C D and E follow from B pretty soon you have an entire system laid out before you In Childs case take a spear point a piece of red ocher and a couple of bones and add in an understanding of ancient climatology and suddenly long vanished peoples start to come aliveHis interest in experiencing the wild first hand sometimes put him in alarming situations such as wandering away from an Alaskan village in the middle of the night with no weapon or other form of protection and then realizing that the animals coming toward him looked like wolves Oops At another time he and some friends went off deep in to the Alaskan bush and made camp on an island in the river A large black bear jumped in from the bank and swam toward them Once again they had no weapon and no way to defend themselves and if that bear had not misjudged the strength of the current and the angle needed to get to them things could have ended badly Finally to experience what it was like to live in the Arctic cold he spent a night on a frozen lake when the temperature was 20 degrees below zero and he brought no tent I wonder if people start backing away from him when he suggests heading out into the wilderness for some funThere is good science in this book especially when it ties together climate geology and the surprisingly sophisticated stone and bone tools and weapons the early peoples used It is not however a science book and the style is markedly different from what someone like a professional archaeologist would have written I couldn t uite put my finger on it until he described the bones and grave goods of a particular site and said the person was probably a tribal shaman Shaman that s the word I was looking for Childs intense personal commitment to ancient sites combined with his holistic approach to interpreting the data and modern re creations of the tools and techniues draw the reader in but can also seem wacky at times a shamanistic approach to his subject Sometimes his writing gets so florid it made me smile and wonder if he really should have been a fiction writer as in Storm clouds split into ghost fingers through the mountains and streamed over the dead lake p 191 At another point he plays hide and seek seriously with some other researchers and pretends to be the last of the mammoths evading a human hunting party That s going pretty far down the rabbit hole of immersion in one s subjectFor the reader with little previous knowledge about the early inhabitants of the Western Hemisphere the book has lots of interesting information The arrival in the New World was almost certainly not a single event but was repeated by many peoples over thousands of years and the journey was not just one way since artifacts with clear North American designs have been found in Siberia Although the most ancient known sites are from about 20000 years ago there are suspicions that humans may have been here much longer than that When the ice started to retreat some people found open passages that led them south and others seemed to have moved down the coast in boats Childs makes the interesting point that birds may have played a significant role in the migration south the tribes would have seen them arriving in the Arctic during the summer and understood that they must have a winter home somewhere warm enough to survive when cold and darkness returned to the NorthOne of the most interesting discussions is about the spread of Clovis culture and its distinctive stone tools The Clovis spear points strikingly resemble those of the Solutrean culture from Western Europe and the argument is that during the last of the ice ages when an ice bridge stretched from Europe to what is now Canada people could have migrated along the edge of the ice to the New World surviving by fishing and sealing along the way Although the Solutrean Hypothesis is not widely accepted by archaeologists it is not voodoo science either and raises intriguing possibilitiesClovis was than a technology and it seems to have been an intrinsic part a culture of some kind It spread from the mid Atlantic region across the entire continent in two hundred years which is almost unbelievably fast for this time period Childs discusses some possible interpretations such as it being part of a cult of the hunt and bound up in tribal displays of adulthood and rites of passage At this same time the large North American mammals disappeared possibly from overhunting and the Younger Dryas brought a harsh ice age climate back making life much harder Perhaps Clovis culture helped protect the people from the hostile climate or perhaps it was an act of defiance against itChilds is at his best when he vividly describes some of the ancient landscapes He convinced me that I would not have wanted to live in Florida back then no matter how cheap waterfront property was There were so many large predators from gators to bears to big cats and Dire Wolves that humans were probably an item on the menu rather than the apex of the food chainThe humans survived and ultimately prospered in the New World spreading coast to coast from above the Arctic Circle to the tip of Chile As the weather warmed the Clovis culture broke up into distinct local societies By the time the Europeans arrived there were thousands of tribes with their own histories and mythologies speaking hundreds of different languagesThe book has some odd and even off putting moments but it is full of interesting information and believable conjectures For the nonspecialist it is a good introduction to the arrival and spread of the first humans in the New World

Read ç eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ì Craig Childs

characters Atlas of a Lost World ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download From the author of Apocalyptic Planet comes a vivid travelogue through prehistory that traces the arrival of the first people in North America at least twenty thousand years ago and the artifacts that tell of their lives and fatesIn Atlas of a Lost World Craig Childs upends our notions of where these people came from and who they were How they got here persevered and ultimately thrived is a story that resonates from the Pleistocene to our modern era The lower sea levels of the Ice Age exposed a vast land bridge between Asia and North America but. This is not a scientific text Not even close What this is is a lyrical travelogue through ice age sites in America Childs doesn t show us The Story of prehistoric man on this continent but rather A Story filled with possibilities even probabilities based on evidence of tool making camp sites kill sites and his own vivid imaginings of what his experiences in these places might have been like ten or fifteen thousand years agoMoving back and forth from his own travels to his recreation of ice age life in the same spots Childs captures a deep sense of what early man must have endured to be here and what he must have found to keep him here Childs tracks the megafauna like mammoths and mastodons the evolution of knapped stone tools migration patterns He thinks deeply about the meaning behind what he finds and creates what feels like a dialogue with the earth and the spirits of those who who first walked hereOne of the most interesting aspects of the book is the discussion of first humans The dates for the first human habitation of the Americas keep getting moved back in time as research often vigorously denied and eually vigorously defended unearths earlier and earlier human made objects While Childs seems to believe the evidence for far earlier habitation he is careful to present different points of view He even mentions the Solutrean hypothesis which posits that the earliest human migration to the Americas came from Europe about 21000 years ago not Asia He s uick to point out that the hypothesis is most popular with white nationalists who choose to believe that the origins of the Americas were European not Asia He is also is uick to point out that even if it was true something genetic research has cast serious doubt on Solutrean man would have been very far from modern Europeans and much like Cheddar Man Childs asks a great many uestions and presents a great many possible answers but what he gives us is a highly personal view of ice age life filtered through his 21st century life and experience He hasn t written a scientific treatise he s written a love letter to a time and place long gone but deeply important and very much to be cherished as what makes the Americas what they are today

Free download Atlas of a Lost World

characters Atlas of a Lost World ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Craig Childs Ì 7 Free download Ld themselves have been prey to the much larger animals Atlas of a Lost World chronicles the last millennia of the Ice Age the violent oscillations and retreat of glaciers the clues and traces that document the first encounters of early humans and the animals whose presence governed the humans' chances for survival A blend of science and personal narrative reveals how much has changed since the time of mammoth hunters and how little Across unexplored landscapes yet to be peopled readers will see the Ice Age and their own age in a whole new light. Interesting subject crap execution The writer s style is that of wannabe novelistpoet and it hampers the uality of the work What s worse and the reason I stopped reading halfway through was the statement on page 144 that cottonmouth bites are freuently fatal The last confirmed fatal cottonmouth bite in the US was in the early 70 s and there are dozens to hundreds of bites estimated per year Maybe this is a minor uibble and it certainly isn t relevant to the main thrust of the book but if the author couldn t get this fact right one that can be confirmed in about 90 sec of googling for a book published in 2018 can anything presented as fact really be trusted If he s so willing to just go along with folklore and myth instead of factchecking what s the validity of this book or the information therein